Tag Archives: EU law

The Competence of the European Union in Copyright Lawmaking

competence-of-eu-in-copyright-lawmakingBook launch event at the IALS
6pm – 8pm, 15 Dec 2016

Register online at Eventbrite to book your free ticket

Speaker: Dr Ana Ramalho, Assistant Professor of Intellectual Property, Maastricht University

Discussant: Professor Lionel Bently, Herchel Smith Professor of Intellectual Property and Director of the Centre for Intellectual Property and Information Law, University of Cambridge.

In this seminar Ana Ramalho will discuss her new book, which inquires into the competence of the EU to legislate in the field of copyright and uses content analysis techniques to demonstrate the existence of a normative gap in copyright lawmaking.

To address that gap Ana Ramalho proposes the creation of benchmarks of legislative activity, reasoning that EU secondary legislation, such as directives and regulations, should be based on higher sources of law.

In the book she investigates two such possible sources: the activity of the EU Court of Justice in the pre-legislative era and the EU treaties. From these sources Ana Ramalho establishes concrete benchmarks of legislative activity, which she then tests by applying them to current EU copyright legislation.

This provides examples of good and bad practices in copyright lawmaking and also shows how the benchmarks could be implemented in copyright legislation. Finally, Ana Ramalho offers some recommendations in this regard.

This seminar will be followed by the book launch of “The Competence of the European Union in Copyright Lawmaking: A Normative Perspective of EU Powers for Copyright Harmonization” by Ana Ramalho

Analysing the Advocate General’s opinion on data retention and EU law

7562831366_66f986c3ea_o (1)Last week, the Advocate General published an opinion on a case brought to the European Court of Justice concerning the compatibility of the UK and Sweden’s data retention laws with EU law.

In a detailed analysis, Lorna Woods, Professor of Internet Law at the University of Essex considers the potential implications of the opinion for national data retention regimes (including the UK’s Investigatory Powers Bill) and the legal tensions which arise from the Advocate General’s opinion. This post first appeared on Professor Steve Peer’s EU Law Analysis blog.     

The Advocate General’s opinion concerns two references from national courts which both arose in the aftermath of the invalidation of the Data Retention Directive (Directive 2006/24) in Digital Rights Ireland dealing with whether the retention of communications data en masse complies with EU law.

The question is important for the regimes that triggered the references, but in the background is a larger question: can mass retention of data ever be human rights compliant. While the Advocate General clearly states this is possible, things may not be that straightforward. Continue reading

Brendan Van Alsenoy: I tweet therefore I am … subject to data protection law?

In this guest blog post, Brendan Van Alsenoy – legal researcher at the Centre for IT and IP Law, University of Leuven – analyses the scope of the personal use exemption under the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

A note with regard to the relevance of the GDPR to the UK: this post was written before the EU referendum result on 24th June. For the ICO’s statement on the potential regulatory implications of a UK exit from the EU please see this link.

The blog post was originally posted on the CiTiP blog at KU Leuven. It is based on a draft paper included in the CiTiP Working Paper Series. You can follow the CiTiP on Twitter here.


In less than 30 years, individuals have transcended their role as passive “data subjects” to become actively involved in the creation, distribution and consumption of personal data. Unless an exemption or derogation applies, individuals are – at least in theory – subject to data protection law.

The evolving role of the individual

We use information and communication technologies every day. Mobile devices tell us where to eat, who to meet and how to get there. We share pictures, post videos and tweet reviews. We google everything and everyone.

With all these processing capabilities at our fingertips, the question can be asked: are we subject to EU data protection law?

Continue reading