Tag Archives: national security

Signed Statement Condemns DHS Proposal to Demand Passwords to Enter the U.S.

A group of 50 organisations and nearly 90 individual experts have signed a statement against the US Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) proposal to ask non-citizens to provide the passwords to their social media accounts in order to enter the United States.

The social media password proposal was raised by Secretary John Kelly at the House Homeland Security Committee hearing on 7th February.

The signed statement, which has been organised by the Center for Democracy & Technology, recognises the United States Government’s need to protect its borders but argues that a “blanket policy of demanding passwords” would “undermine security, privacy, and other rights”.

To view the full statement with list of signatories please click here.

How the UK passed the most invasive surveillance law in democratic history

IPBill image

In this guest post, Paul Bernal, Lecturer in Information Technology, Intellectual Property and Media Law at the University of East Anglia, reflects on the passage of the Investigatory Powers Bill. The legislation was recently passed in Parliament and given Royal Assent on 29 November 2016.

You might not have noticed thanks to world events, but the UK parliament recently approved the government’s so-called Snooper’s Charter and it has now become law. This nickname for the Investigatory Powers Bill is well earned. It represents a new level and nature of surveillance that goes beyond anything previously set out in law in a democratic society. It is not a modernisation of existing law, but something qualitatively different, something that intrudes upon every UK citizen’s life in a way that would even a decade ago have been inconceivable. Continue reading

Upcoming event, 19 October 2015, 6.30pm: Whose Investigatory Power Is It Anyway? Security, Source Protection and Surveillance

The Information Law and Policy Centre at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, in collaboration with the Media Society, is pleased to announce this exciting panel event, featuring Kate Allen, Director, Amnesty International UK, Rt Hon Dominic Grieve QC MP, Former Attorney General, Ewen MacAskill, Defence and Intelligence Correspondent, The Guardian, and Jessica Simor QC, Barrister, Matrix Chambers.

Whose Investigatory Power Is It Anyway?

Security, Source Protection and Surveillance

Monday October 19th 6.30 for 7pm

Reed Smith LLP

The Broadgate Tower, 20 Primrose Street, London EC2A 2RS

Book your place here

David Anderson QC’s long-awaited review of surveillance law recommends legislative overhaul, including a stronger role for the judiciary, and the government has promised to “modernise” the law on communications data with a new Investigatory Powers Bill. But will the government get the balance right? What are the likely effects if some, all or none of the Anderson recommendations are followed? What are the implications for journalism and freedom of expression? How would Anderson’s recommendations affect national security and efforts to prevent terrorism? And do they address reasonable concerns about privacy rights? Meanwhile, the row continues over the NSA leaks, with whistle-blower Edward Snowden characterised as both hero and villain in the media. This special Media Society event with leading journalists, politicians and campaigners will look at the tense and complex debates within and between UK intelligence agencies, government departments and media organisations, asking who should have what investigatory powers.

PANEL:

  • Kate Allen, Director, Amnesty International UK
  • Rt Hon Dominic Grieve QC MP, Former Attorney General
  • Ewen MacAskill, Defence and Intelligence Correspondent, The Guardian
  • Jessica Simor QC, Barrister, Matrix Chambers

CHAIR:

  • Dr Judith Townend, Director, Information Law and Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of London

ORGANISER:

The Media Society, in association with the Information Law and Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

With grateful thanks to our host Reed Smith LLP

TICKETS

Students – £5.00, Media Society Members – £10.00, Guests – £15.00.

Book via Eventbrite