Tag Archives: social media

Signed Statement Condemns DHS Proposal to Demand Passwords to Enter the U.S.

A group of 50 organisations and nearly 90 individual experts have signed a statement against the US Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS) proposal to ask non-citizens to provide the passwords to their social media accounts in order to enter the United States.

The social media password proposal was raised by Secretary John Kelly at the House Homeland Security Committee hearing on 7th February.

The signed statement, which has been organised by the Center for Democracy & Technology, recognises the United States Government’s need to protect its borders but argues that a “blanket policy of demanding passwords” would “undermine security, privacy, and other rights”.

To view the full statement with list of signatories please click here.

Social media and crime: the good, the bad and the ugly

social media and crime

Social media has revolutionised how we communicate. As part of a series for The Conversation, Alyce McGovern, UNSW Australia and Sanja Milivojevic, La Trobe University summarise how social media is affecting crime and criminal justice.  


The popularity of social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat have transformed the way we understand and experience crime and victimisation.

Previously, it’s been thought that people form their opinions about crime from what they see or read in the media. But with social media taking over as our preferred news source, how do these new platforms impact our understanding of crime?

Social media has also created new concerns in relation to crime itself. Victimisation on social media platforms is not uncommon.

However, it is not all bad news. Social media has created new opportunities for criminal justice agencies to solve crimes, among other things.

Thus, like many other advancements in communication technology, social media has a good, a bad and an ugly side when it comes to its relationship with criminal justice and the law. Continue reading

Upcoming seminar, School of Advanced Study: Legally navigating academic blogging and social media – 29 April

On Wednesday lunchtime, I’ll be giving a talk at the regular Social Scholar seminar, at the School of Advanced Study, on legal issues for academic bloggers and social media users (all welcome):

While social media tools are fantastically liberating for academic communication, users need to be aware of the legal and ethical context. Those trained in journalism or law will probably be aware of the most important media and communication-related laws, but my research suggests there are many bloggers and social media users who are uncertain about the boundaries of legitimate speech. What’s more, the complexity of UK media law (and high cost of resolving a civil dispute) makes it an uncertain environment for even the most experienced and legally astute. My contribution to the Social Scholar series will discuss the main legal issues for academic bloggers and social media users, point towards useful guides, and offer some thoughts on how legal resources and systems might be improved.

Details

  • Speaker: Dr Judith Townend (Director, Centre for Law and Information Policy, IALS/SAS)
  • Time: Wednesday 29 April 2015, 1pm-2pm
  • Location: Room 246 (Senate House, 2nd Floor)
  • All welcome! No prior registration needed. For full details see the Event Page