Monthly Archives: September 2017

Co-existing with HAL 9000: Being Human in a World with AI

This event took place at the Information Law and Policy Centre at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on Monday, 20 November 2017.

Date
20 Nov 2017, 17:30 to 20 Nov 2017, 19:30
Venue
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

Description

As part of the University of London’s Being Human Festival, the Information Law and Policy Centre will be hosting a film and discussion panel evening at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

One of the Centre’s key aims is to promote public engagement by bringing together academic experts, policy-makers, industry, artists, and key civil society stakeholders (such as NGOs, journalists) to discuss issues and ideas concerning information law and policy relevant to the public interest that will capture the public’s imagination.

This event will focus on the implications posed by the increasingly significant role of artificial intelligence (AI) in society and the possible ways in which humans will co-exist with AI in future, particularly the impact that this interaction will have on our liberty, privacy, and agency. Will the benefits of AI only be achieved at the expense of these human rights and values? Do current laws, ethics, or technologies offer any guidance with respect to how we should navigate this future society?

The primary purpose of this event is to particularly encourage engagement and interest from young adults (15-18 years) in considering the implications for democracy, civil liberties, and human rights posed by the increasing role of AI in society that affect their everyday decision-making as humans and citizens. A limited number of places for this event will also be available to the general public.

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Call for Papers: Global Fake News and Defamation Symposium

Readers of the Information and Law Policy Centre blog are invited to submit a call for papers for the Global Fake News and Defamation Symposium on the theme of ‘Fake News and Weaponized Defamation: Global Perspectives’

Concept Note:

The notion of “fake news” has gained great currency in global popular culture in the wake of contentious social-media imbued elections in the United States and Europe. Although often associated with the rise of extremist voices in political discourse and, specifically, an agenda to “deconstruct” the power of government, institutional media, and the scientific establishment, fake news is “new wine in old bottles,” a phenomenon that has long historical roots in government propaganda, jingoistic newspapers, and business-controlled public relations. In some countries, dissemination of “fake news” is a crime that is used to stifle dissent. This broad conception of fake news not only acts to repress evidence-based inquiry of government, scientists, and the press; but it also diminishes the power of populations to seek informed consensus on policies such as climate change, healthcare, race and gender equality, religious tolerance, national security, drug abuse, poverty, homophobia, and government corruption, among others.

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Has Facebook finally given up chasing teenagers? It’s complicated

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Facebook Watch.
Facebook

In this guest post, Harry T Dyer, University of East Anglia, looks into the complicated relationship between social media and young people. His article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

Facebook’s latest attempt to appeal to teens has quietly closed its doors. The social media platform’s Lifestage app (so unsuccessful that this is probably the first time you’ve heard of it) was launched a little under a year ago to resounding apathy and has struggled ever since.

Yet, as is Silicon Valley’s way, Facebook has rapidly followed the failure of one venture with the launch of another one by unveiling a new video streaming service. Facebook Watch will host series of live and pre-recorded short-form videos, including some original, professionally made content, in a move that will allow the platform to more directly compete with the likes of YouTube, Netflix and traditional TV channels.

Lifestage was just one of a long series of attempts by Facebook to stem the tide of young people increasingly interacting across multiple platforms. With Watch, the company seems to have changed tack from this focus on retaining young people, instead targeting a much wider user base. Perhaps Facebook has learnt that it will simply never be cool –, but that doesn’t mean it still can’t be popular.

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Why the very idea of ‘screen time’ is muddled and misguided

In this guest post, Dr Natalia Kucirkova, UCL and Professor Sonia Livingstone, (London School of Economics and Political Science), explore ‘screen time’ as an outdated term and why we need to recognise the power of learning through  screen-based technologies. Their article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

The idea of “screen time” causes arguments – but not just between children and their anxious parents. The Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, recently compared overuse of social media to junk food and urged parents to regulate screen time using her “Digital 5 A Day” campaign.

This prompted the former director of Britain’s electronic surveillance agency, GCHQ, to respond by telling parents to increase screen time for children so they can gain skills to “save the country”, since the UK is “desperately” short of engineers and computer scientists.

Meanwhile, parents are left in the middle, trying to make sense of it all.

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