Monthly Archives: October 2017

Too much information? More than 80% of children have an online presence by the age of two

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In this guest post, Claire Bessant, Northumbria University, Newcastle, looks into the phenomenon of ‘sharenting’. Her article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

A toddler with birthday cake smeared across his face, grins delightedly at his mother. Minutes later, the image appears on Facebook. A not uncommon scenario – 42% of UK parents share photos of their children online with half of these parents sharing photos at least once a month.

Welcome to the world of “sharenting” – where more than 80% of children are said to have an online presence by the age of two. This is a world where the average parent shares almost 1,500 images of their child online before their fifth birthday.

But while a recent report from OFCOM confirms many parents do share images of their children online, the report also indicates that more than half (56%) of parents don’t. Most of these non-sharenting parents (87%) actively choose not to do so to protect their children’s private lives.

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Call for Papers: Trust, Risk, Information & the Law Conference

The 5th interdisciplinary Conference on Trust, Risk, Information & the Law will be held on 25 April 2018 at the Holiday Inn, Winchester UK. Our overall theme for this conference will be: “Public Law, Politics and the Constitution: A new battleground between the Law and Technology?”

Our keynote speakers will be Michael Barton, Chief Constable of Durham Constabulary and Jamie Bartlett, Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media for Demos in conjunction with the University of Sussex, and author of several books including ‘Radicals’ and ‘The Dark Net’.

Papers are welcomed on any aspect of the conference theme. This might include although is not restricted to:

  • Fake news: definition, consequences, responsibilities and liabilities;

  • The use of Big Data in political campaigning;

  • Social media ‘echo chambers’ and political campaigning;

  • Digital threats and impact on the political process;

  • The Dark Net and consequences for the State and the Constitution;

  • Big Tech – the new States and how to regulate them;

  • The use of algorithmic tools and Big Data by the public sector;

  • Tackling terrorist propaganda and digital communications within Constitutional values;

  • Technology neutral legislation;

  • Threats to individual privacy and public law solutions;

  • Online courts and holding the State to account.

Proposals for workshops are also welcome.

 

The full call for papers and workshops can be found at: https://journals.winchesteruniversitypress.org/index.php/jirpp/pages/view/TRIL.

Deadline for submissions is 26 January 2018.

On Internet Intermediaries – from Defamation to Directive to Data Protection

In this guest post,  Professor of Law and Innovation at Queen’s University Belfast Daithí Mac Síthigh reviews the recent Information Law and Policy Centre seminar that explored Internet intermediaries and their legal role and obligations.

Taking stock of recent developments concerning the liability and duties associated with being an Internet intermediary (especially the provision of hosting and social media services) was the theme of a recent event at the Information Law and Policy Centre. In my presentation, starting from about 20 years ago, I reviewed the early statutory interventions, including the broad protection against liability contained in US law (and the narrower shield in respect of intellectual property!), and the conditional provisions adopted by the European Union in Directive 2000/31/EC (E-Commerce Directive), alongside developments in specific areas, such as defamation. The most recent 10 years, though, have seen a trend towards specific solutions for one area of law or another (what I called ‘fragmentation’ in 2013), as well as a growing body of caselaw on liability, injunctions, and the like (both from the Court of Justice of the EU and the domestic courts).

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