Tag Archives: events

Personal Data as an Asset: Design and Incentive Alignments in a Personal Data Economy

Registration open

Date
19 Feb 2018, 17:30 to 19 Feb 2018, 19:30
Institute
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Venue
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR


Speaker:  Professor Irene Ng, Director of the International Institute for Product and Service Innovation and the Professor of Marketing and Service Systems at WMG, University of Warwick
Panel Discussants: Perry Keller, King’s College London and John Sheridan, National ArchivesChair:  Dr Nora Ni Loideain, Director and Lecturer in Law, Information Law & Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies

 

Description:

Despite the World Economic Forum (2011) report on personal data becoming an asset class  the cost of transacting on personal data is becoming increasingly high with regulatory risks, societal disapproval, legal complexity and privacy concerns.

Professor Irene Ng contends that this is because personal data as an asset is currently controlled by organisations. As a co-produced asset, the person has not had the technological capability to control and process his or her own data or indeed, data in general. Hence, legal and economic structures have been created only around Organisation-controlled personal data (OPD).

This presentation will argue that a person-controlled personal data (PPD), technologically, legally and economically architected such that the individual owns a personal micro-server and therefore have full rights to the data within, much like owning a PC or a smartphone, is potentially a route to reducing transaction costs and innovating in the personal data economy. I will present the design and incentive alignments of stakeholders on the HAT hub-of-all-things platform (https://hubofallthings.com).

Professor Irene Ng is the Director of the International Institute for Product and Service Innovation and the Professor of Marketing and Service Systems at WMG, University of Warwick. She is also the Chairman of the Hub-of-all-Things (HAT) Foundation Group (http://hubofallthings.com). A market design economist, Professor Ng is an advisor to large organisations, startups and governments on design of markets, economic and business models in the digital economy. Personal website http://ireneng.com

John Sheridan is the Digital Director at The National Archives, with overall responsibility for the organisation’s digital services and digital archiving capability. His role is to provide strategic direction, developing the people and capability needed for The National Archives to become a disruptive digital archive. John’s academic background is in mathematics and information technology, with a degree in Mathematics and Computer Science from the University of Southampton and a Master’s Degree in Information Technology from the University of Liverpool. Prior to his current role, John was the Head of Legislation Services at The National Archives where he led the team responsible for creating legislation.gov.uk, as well overseeing the operation of the official Gazette. John recently led, as Principal Investigator, an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project, ‘big data for law’, exploring the application of data analytics to the statute book, winning the Halsbury Legal Award for Innovation. John has a strong interest in the web and data standards and is a former co-chair of the W3C e-Government Interest Group. He serves on the UK Government’s Data Leaders group and Open Standards Board which sets data standards for use across government. John was an early pioneer of open data and remains active in that community.

Perry Keller is Reader in Media and Information Law at the Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London, where he teaches and researches issues relating to freedom of expression, privacy and data protection. He is the author of European and International Media Law. Mr Keller’s current research concerns the transparency of urban life as a consequence of governmental and commercial surveillance and the particular challenges that brings for liberal democracies. He also has longstanding connections with China, having previously studied or worked in Beijing, Nanjing, Taipei and Hong Kong. His current research interests regarding law and regulation in China concern the development of a divergent Chinese model for securing data privacy and security.

A wine reception will follow this seminar.


Admission FREE but advance booking is required.

 

Guilty until proven innocent? How a legal loophole is being used to name and shame children

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In this guest post, Faith Gordon, University of Westminster explores how, under UK law, a child’s anonimity is not entirely guaranteed. Faith is speaking at the  Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards this Friday, 17 November. 

Under the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, each individual is presumed innocent until proven guilty. A big part of protecting this principle is guaranteeing that public opinion is not biased against someone that is about to be tried in the courts. In this situation, minors are particularly vulnerable and need all the protection that can be legally offered. So when you read stories about cases involving children, it’s often accompanied with the line that the accused cannot be named for legal reasons.

However, a loophole exists: a minor can be named before being formally charged. And as we all know in this digital age, being named comes with consequences – details or images shared of the child are permanent. While the right to be forgotten is the strongest for children within the Data Protection Bill, children and young people know that when their images and posts are screenshot they have little or no control over how they are used and who has access to them.

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Too much information? More than 80% of children have an online presence by the age of two

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In this guest post, Claire Bessant, Northumbria University, Newcastle, looks into the phenomenon of ‘sharenting’. Her article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

A toddler with birthday cake smeared across his face, grins delightedly at his mother. Minutes later, the image appears on Facebook. A not uncommon scenario – 42% of UK parents share photos of their children online with half of these parents sharing photos at least once a month.

Welcome to the world of “sharenting” – where more than 80% of children are said to have an online presence by the age of two. This is a world where the average parent shares almost 1,500 images of their child online before their fifth birthday.

But while a recent report from OFCOM confirms many parents do share images of their children online, the report also indicates that more than half (56%) of parents don’t. Most of these non-sharenting parents (87%) actively choose not to do so to protect their children’s private lives.

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Call for Papers: Trust, Risk, Information & the Law Conference

The 5th interdisciplinary Conference on Trust, Risk, Information & the Law will be held on 25 April 2018 at the Holiday Inn, Winchester UK. Our overall theme for this conference will be: “Public Law, Politics and the Constitution: A new battleground between the Law and Technology?”

Our keynote speakers will be Michael Barton, Chief Constable of Durham Constabulary and Jamie Bartlett, Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media for Demos in conjunction with the University of Sussex, and author of several books including ‘Radicals’ and ‘The Dark Net’.

Papers are welcomed on any aspect of the conference theme. This might include although is not restricted to:

  • Fake news: definition, consequences, responsibilities and liabilities;

  • The use of Big Data in political campaigning;

  • Social media ‘echo chambers’ and political campaigning;

  • Digital threats and impact on the political process;

  • The Dark Net and consequences for the State and the Constitution;

  • Big Tech – the new States and how to regulate them;

  • The use of algorithmic tools and Big Data by the public sector;

  • Tackling terrorist propaganda and digital communications within Constitutional values;

  • Technology neutral legislation;

  • Threats to individual privacy and public law solutions;

  • Online courts and holding the State to account.

Proposals for workshops are also welcome.

 

The full call for papers and workshops can be found at: https://journals.winchesteruniversitypress.org/index.php/jirpp/pages/view/TRIL.

Deadline for submissions is 26 January 2018.

Co-existing with HAL 9000: Being Human in a World with AI

This event took place at the Information Law and Policy Centre at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on Monday, 20 November 2017.

Date
20 Nov 2017, 17:30 to 20 Nov 2017, 19:30
Venue
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR

Description

As part of the University of London’s Being Human Festival, the Information Law and Policy Centre will be hosting a film and discussion panel evening at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

One of the Centre’s key aims is to promote public engagement by bringing together academic experts, policy-makers, industry, artists, and key civil society stakeholders (such as NGOs, journalists) to discuss issues and ideas concerning information law and policy relevant to the public interest that will capture the public’s imagination.

This event will focus on the implications posed by the increasingly significant role of artificial intelligence (AI) in society and the possible ways in which humans will co-exist with AI in future, particularly the impact that this interaction will have on our liberty, privacy, and agency. Will the benefits of AI only be achieved at the expense of these human rights and values? Do current laws, ethics, or technologies offer any guidance with respect to how we should navigate this future society?

The primary purpose of this event is to particularly encourage engagement and interest from young adults (15-18 years) in considering the implications for democracy, civil liberties, and human rights posed by the increasing role of AI in society that affect their everyday decision-making as humans and citizens. A limited number of places for this event will also be available to the general public.

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Call for Papers: Global Fake News and Defamation Symposium

Readers of the Information and Law Policy Centre blog are invited to submit a call for papers for the Global Fake News and Defamation Symposium on the theme of ‘Fake News and Weaponized Defamation: Global Perspectives’

Concept Note:

The notion of “fake news” has gained great currency in global popular culture in the wake of contentious social-media imbued elections in the United States and Europe. Although often associated with the rise of extremist voices in political discourse and, specifically, an agenda to “deconstruct” the power of government, institutional media, and the scientific establishment, fake news is “new wine in old bottles,” a phenomenon that has long historical roots in government propaganda, jingoistic newspapers, and business-controlled public relations. In some countries, dissemination of “fake news” is a crime that is used to stifle dissent. This broad conception of fake news not only acts to repress evidence-based inquiry of government, scientists, and the press; but it also diminishes the power of populations to seek informed consensus on policies such as climate change, healthcare, race and gender equality, religious tolerance, national security, drug abuse, poverty, homophobia, and government corruption, among others.

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Call for Papers: Financing and the Right to Science in Technology Transfer in the SDGs

Readers of the Information and Law Policy Centre blog are invited to participate in the second, full-day International Law for the Sustainable Development Goals Workshop at the Department of International Law, University of Groningen, NL.

Our aim with the second track of this one-day Workshop is to explore the right to science’s potential value in the context of technology & knowledge transfer and sustainable development. More specifically, we aim to discuss the role of the right to science as (a) a means to implement the SDGs and related human rights; (b) an enabler of international cooperation regarding technology and knowledge sharing; and (c) a stand-alone human right and the respective obligations of States in enhancing systemic policy and institutional coherence and informing policy development and coordination.

Please find the the detailed Call for Papers available here.

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ECREA Communication Law and Policy Section Workshop

Readers of the Information and Law Policy Centre blog may be interested in the following ECREA event.

The Future of Media Content:
Interventions and Industries in the Internet Era
15 – 16 September 2017

The “Communication Law and Policy” and “Media Industries and Cultural Production” Sections of the European Communications Research and Education Association (ECREA) invite you to their 2017 joint workshop on The Future of Content: Interventions and Industries in the Internet Era, hosted by the University of East Anglia’s School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communication Studies. This unique opportunity will bring together those investigating the processes of production and distribution with those studying the policy and regulation governing those processes.

Renowned Prof Eli Noam from Columbia University, NY will deliver the keynote address. A keynote panel of industry and policy actors will additionally set the tone for a day and a half of research-based discussions on trends and challenges.

Media and communications industries have changed dramatically over the past decade and both businesses and policy makers are struggling to adapt. Legacy media companies engaged in cultural and news production are trying to change their business models in a manner that will allow them to survive in the face of increased competition for advertising income and the constraints of having a new breed of intermediaries between them and their audiences.

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Event: “The Legal Challenges of Social Media”

This event took place at the Information Law and Policy Centre at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies on Thursday, 6 July 2017.

Date: 6 July 2017
Time: 15:00 to 17:00
Venue: Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, 17 Russell Square, London WC1B 5DR
Book now: Free event. Advanced registration on the SAS booking site required.

Social Media phone picThe Legal Challenges of Social Media

Chairs: David Mangan, City Law School, and Lorna Gillies, University of Strathclyde

Contributors include: 
Ian Walden, Queen Mary, University of London
Daithí Mac Síthigh, University of Newcastle
Edina Harbinja, University of Hertfordshire and University of Strathclyde
Lorna Woods, University of Essex

Social media enables instant access to individual self-expression and the sharing of information. Social media issues are boundless, permeating distinct legal disciplines. The law has struggled to adapt and for good reason: how does the law regulate this medium over the public/private law divide?

This event will facilitate a discussion of this critical issue and others included in a new book: The Legal Challenges of Social Media (edited by David Mangan and Lorna E Gillies, Edward Elgar, 2017). The book engages with the legal implications of social media from public and private law perspectives and outlines how the law, in various legal sub-disciplines and with varying success, has endeavoured to adapt existing tools to social media.

Book online on the SAS bookings website.
Photo: Jason Howie, (CC BY 2.0)

Where to after Watson: The challenges and future of data retention in the UK

An event hosted by the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law and sponsored by Simmons & Simmons. 

Date: 11th May 2017
Time: 17:30 – 19:30 (Registration open from 17:00). Followed by a reception
Venue: Simmons & Simmons, City Point, 1 Ropemaker Street, London EC2Y 9SS
Cost: Members £15, Non-members £25

This event can be booked on the British Institute for International and Comparative Law website. Book now.

The judgment of the CJEU in the Watson case was handed down shortly before the year’s end in 2016. The determination that member states may not impose on communications providers a general obligation to retain data was applauded by privacy groups and has undoubtedly caused disquiet among those involved in policing and intelligence. What parliamentarians and judges will make of it in the coming months – and, post-Brexit, years – is both uncertain and important.

In this event, experts will examine the strengths, weaknesses and implications of the decision, with an eye to rights protections, the need to combat serious crime, and the practicalities of managing both in light of the European Court’s decision.

Speakers:

  • The Rt Hon Dominic Grieve QC MP, Chair of the Intelligence and Security Committee
  • Max Hill QC, Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation
  • Dr Nora Ni Loideain, Incoming Director, Information Law and Policy Centre, IALS
  • Renate Samson, Chief Executive, Big Brother Watch

Chair:

  • Professor Lorna Woods, University of Essex

For more information download the event flyer and join in the conversation: @BinghamCentre, #Watson