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Cover PageThe journal Digital Evidence and Electronic Signature Law Review has made the transition to an open access and an online-only format for its latest edition. 

Articles in  Volume 11: 2014 cover electronic evidence and electronic signature issues in several jurisdictions and in international contexts:

  • Zee Kin Yeong on Electronic discovery in Singapore
  • Christoph Gasser on Electronic legal correspondence in Switzerland
  • Ronald Yu and Paul Taylor on Hong Kong’s new electronic discovery procedures
  • Dr Khaled Aljneibi on The scope of electronic transactions and electronic evidence in the courts of the United Arab Emirates
  • Gareth Norris on The influence of computer generated animations on juror decision making
  • David Silva Ramalho on The use of malware as a means of obtaining evidence in Portuguese criminal proceedings
  • Timothy Tion on Electronic evidence in Nigeria
  • Aniello Merone on Electronic signatures in Italian law
  • Franco Ruggieri on Security in digital data preservation
  • Aida Ashouri and Caleb Bowers on Digital Evidence and the American Servicemembers’ Protection Act
  • Aida Ashouri, Caleb Bowers, and Cherrie Warden on An Overview of the Use of Digital Evidence in International Criminal Courts
  • Tommy Umberg and Cherrie Warden on Digital Evidence and Investigatory Protocols

The 2014 edition also features translations of important recent cases in the field, legislation translation, book reports and details of current research into aspects of electronic evidence and electronic signatures.

In particular, this issue includes an important case on data protection and electronic signatures, translated from the Lithuanian. Data Protection supervisors across the world will probably study this case closely, given its effect on digital certificates and the data that can be included in such a certificate. This is the second case on electronic signatures to date, the first one being a Canadian case relating to the hand-held devices used to ‘sign’ for parcels and such like that are delivered, full details of which are set out in Electronic Signatures in Law (3rd ed, Cambridge University Press, 2012), chapter 10.

This Open Access version of Digital Evidence and Electronic Signature Law Review, which was established in 2004, has been developed by Stephen Mason (founder, publisher and general editor) with the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) on the School of Advanced Study’s Open Journals System.

The complete run of back issues of Digital Evidence and Electronic Signature Law Review is also published online by IALS in SAS Open Journals at http://journals.sas.ac.uk/deeslr.

Source: IALS – Digital Evidence and Electronic Signature Law Review Volume 11: 2014 is born digital.