Tag Archives: social media

Annual Conference 2017 Resources

The Information Law and Policy Centre held its third annual conference on 17th November 2017. The workshop’s theme was: ‘Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards’.

The workshop brought together regulators, practitioners, civil society, and leading academic experts who addressed and examined the key legal frameworks and policies being used and developed to safeguard children’s digital freedoms and rights. These legislative and policy regimes include the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the related provisions (such as consent, transparency, and profiling) under the UK Digital Charter, and the Data Protection Bill which will implement the EU General Data Protection Regulation.

The following resources are available online:

  • Full programme
  • Presentation: ILPC Annual Conference, Baroness Beeban Kidron (video)
  • Presentation: ILPC Annual Conference, Anna Morgan (video)
  • Presentation: ILPC Annual Conference, Lisa Atkinson (video)
  • Presentation: ILPC Annual Conference, Rachael Bishop (video)

AI trust and AI fears: A media debate that could divide society

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In this guest post, Dr Vyacheslav Polonski, Researcher, University of Oxford examines the key question of trust or fear of AI.

We are at a tipping point of a new digital divide. While some embrace AI, many people will always prefer human experts even when they’re wrong.

Unless you live under a rock, you probably have been inundated with recent news on machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). With all the recent breakthroughs, it almost seems like AI can already predict the future. Police forces are using it to map when and where crime is likely to occur. Doctors can use it to predict when a patient is most likely to have a heart attack or stroke. Researchers are even trying to give AI imagination so it can plan for unexpected consequences.

Of course, many decisions in our lives require a good forecast, and AI agents are almost always better at forecasting than their human counterparts. Yet for all these technological advances, we still seem to deeply lack confidence in AI predictions. Recent cases show that people don’t like relying on AI and prefer to trust human experts, even if these experts are wrong.

If we want AI to really benefit people, we need to find a way to get people to trust it. To do that, we need to understand why people are so reluctant to trust AI in the first place.

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A Prediction about Predictions

In this guest post, Marion Oswald offers her homage to Yes Minister and, in that tradition, smuggles in some pertinent observations on AI fears. This post first appeared on the SCL website’s Blog as part of Laurence Eastham’s Predictions 2018 series. It is also appearing in Computers & Law, December/January issue.

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Who’s responsible for what happens on Facebook? Analysis of a new ECJ opinion

In this guest post Lorna Woods, Professor of Internet Law at the University of Essex, provides an analysis on the new ECJ opinion . This post first appeared on the blog of Steve Peers, Professor of EU, Human Rights and World Trade Law at the University of Essex.

Who is responsible for data protection law compliance on Facebook fan sites? That issue is analysed in a recent opinion of an ECJ Advocate-General, in the case of Wirtschaftsakademie (full title: Unabhängiges Landeszentrum für Datenschutz Schleswig-Holstein v Wirtschaftsakademie Schleswig-Holstein GmbH, in the presence of Facebook Ireland Ltd, Vertreter des Bundesinteresses beim Bundesverwaltungsgericht).

This case is one more in a line of cases dealing specifically with the jurisdiction of national data protection supervisory authorities, a line of reasoning which seems to operate separately from the Brussels I Recast Regulation, which concerns jurisdiction of courts over civil and commercial disputes.  While this is an Advocate-General’s opinion, and therefore not binding on the Court, if followed by the Court it would consolidates the Court’s prior broad interpretation of the Data Protection Directive.  While this might be the headline, it is worth considering a perhaps overlooked element of the data-economy: the role of the content provider in providing individuals whose data is harvested.

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Too much information? More than 80% of children have an online presence by the age of two

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In this guest post, Claire Bessant, Northumbria University, Newcastle, looks into the phenomenon of ‘sharenting’. Her article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

A toddler with birthday cake smeared across his face, grins delightedly at his mother. Minutes later, the image appears on Facebook. A not uncommon scenario – 42% of UK parents share photos of their children online with half of these parents sharing photos at least once a month.

Welcome to the world of “sharenting” – where more than 80% of children are said to have an online presence by the age of two. This is a world where the average parent shares almost 1,500 images of their child online before their fifth birthday.

But while a recent report from OFCOM confirms many parents do share images of their children online, the report also indicates that more than half (56%) of parents don’t. Most of these non-sharenting parents (87%) actively choose not to do so to protect their children’s private lives.

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Call for Papers: Trust, Risk, Information & the Law Conference

The 5th interdisciplinary Conference on Trust, Risk, Information & the Law will be held on 25 April 2018 at the Holiday Inn, Winchester UK. Our overall theme for this conference will be: “Public Law, Politics and the Constitution: A new battleground between the Law and Technology?”

Our keynote speakers will be Michael Barton, Chief Constable of Durham Constabulary and Jamie Bartlett, Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media for Demos in conjunction with the University of Sussex, and author of several books including ‘Radicals’ and ‘The Dark Net’.

Papers are welcomed on any aspect of the conference theme. This might include although is not restricted to:

  • Fake news: definition, consequences, responsibilities and liabilities;

  • The use of Big Data in political campaigning;

  • Social media ‘echo chambers’ and political campaigning;

  • Digital threats and impact on the political process;

  • The Dark Net and consequences for the State and the Constitution;

  • Big Tech – the new States and how to regulate them;

  • The use of algorithmic tools and Big Data by the public sector;

  • Tackling terrorist propaganda and digital communications within Constitutional values;

  • Technology neutral legislation;

  • Threats to individual privacy and public law solutions;

  • Online courts and holding the State to account.

Proposals for workshops are also welcome.

 

The full call for papers and workshops can be found at: https://journals.winchesteruniversitypress.org/index.php/jirpp/pages/view/TRIL.

Deadline for submissions is 26 January 2018.

On Internet Intermediaries – from Defamation to Directive to Data Protection

In this guest post,  Professor of Law and Innovation at Queen’s University Belfast Daithí Mac Síthigh reviews the recent Information Law and Policy Centre seminar that explored Internet intermediaries and their legal role and obligations.

Taking stock of recent developments concerning the liability and duties associated with being an Internet intermediary (especially the provision of hosting and social media services) was the theme of a recent event at the Information Law and Policy Centre. In my presentation, starting from about 20 years ago, I reviewed the early statutory interventions, including the broad protection against liability contained in US law (and the narrower shield in respect of intellectual property!), and the conditional provisions adopted by the European Union in Directive 2000/31/EC (E-Commerce Directive), alongside developments in specific areas, such as defamation. The most recent 10 years, though, have seen a trend towards specific solutions for one area of law or another (what I called ‘fragmentation’ in 2013), as well as a growing body of caselaw on liability, injunctions, and the like (both from the Court of Justice of the EU and the domestic courts).

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Call for Papers: Global Fake News and Defamation Symposium

Readers of the Information and Law Policy Centre blog are invited to submit a call for papers for the Global Fake News and Defamation Symposium on the theme of ‘Fake News and Weaponized Defamation: Global Perspectives’

Concept Note:

The notion of “fake news” has gained great currency in global popular culture in the wake of contentious social-media imbued elections in the United States and Europe. Although often associated with the rise of extremist voices in political discourse and, specifically, an agenda to “deconstruct” the power of government, institutional media, and the scientific establishment, fake news is “new wine in old bottles,” a phenomenon that has long historical roots in government propaganda, jingoistic newspapers, and business-controlled public relations. In some countries, dissemination of “fake news” is a crime that is used to stifle dissent. This broad conception of fake news not only acts to repress evidence-based inquiry of government, scientists, and the press; but it also diminishes the power of populations to seek informed consensus on policies such as climate change, healthcare, race and gender equality, religious tolerance, national security, drug abuse, poverty, homophobia, and government corruption, among others.

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Has Facebook finally given up chasing teenagers? It’s complicated

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Facebook Watch.
Facebook

In this guest post, Harry T Dyer, University of East Anglia, looks into the complicated relationship between social media and young people. His article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

Facebook’s latest attempt to appeal to teens has quietly closed its doors. The social media platform’s Lifestage app (so unsuccessful that this is probably the first time you’ve heard of it) was launched a little under a year ago to resounding apathy and has struggled ever since.

Yet, as is Silicon Valley’s way, Facebook has rapidly followed the failure of one venture with the launch of another one by unveiling a new video streaming service. Facebook Watch will host series of live and pre-recorded short-form videos, including some original, professionally made content, in a move that will allow the platform to more directly compete with the likes of YouTube, Netflix and traditional TV channels.

Lifestage was just one of a long series of attempts by Facebook to stem the tide of young people increasingly interacting across multiple platforms. With Watch, the company seems to have changed tack from this focus on retaining young people, instead targeting a much wider user base. Perhaps Facebook has learnt that it will simply never be cool –, but that doesn’t mean it still can’t be popular.

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Why the very idea of ‘screen time’ is muddled and misguided

In this guest post, Dr Natalia Kucirkova, UCL and Professor Sonia Livingstone, (London School of Economics and Political Science), explore ‘screen time’ as an outdated term and why we need to recognise the power of learning through  screen-based technologies. Their article is relevant to the Information Law and Policy Centre’s annual conference coming up in November – Children and Digital Rights: Regulating Freedoms and Safeguards.

The idea of “screen time” causes arguments – but not just between children and their anxious parents. The Children’s Commissioner for England, Anne Longfield, recently compared overuse of social media to junk food and urged parents to regulate screen time using her “Digital 5 A Day” campaign.

This prompted the former director of Britain’s electronic surveillance agency, GCHQ, to respond by telling parents to increase screen time for children so they can gain skills to “save the country”, since the UK is “desperately” short of engineers and computer scientists.

Meanwhile, parents are left in the middle, trying to make sense of it all.

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